You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘amateur hour’ category.

'Craft is an embarrassment for the construction of modern art'
- Glenn Adamson, Thinking Through Craft, 2009.

What would Frida think?

Image: Frida Kahlo handmade pillow on Etsy here

Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.
KDamo interviews Irish art bloggers for the Visual Artist’s Newsheet.
My interview is below and full article is here. Other interviewees are the blogs/ online magazines Some Blind Alleys, SuperMassiveBlackHole, Blackletter, Fieldwork, and Paper Visual Art Journal.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  *
What made you start your blog/online magazine?
My blog started as a curiosity, a kind of experimental, public notebook.  
That’s still its main function really, it’s more an artist’s blog than 
a blog about art. I have a portfolio website and a blog/ RSS news 
feed attached to that, so it’s not about promoting my professional 
practice and I don’t link the two together explicitly.
What reasons do you think are contributing to the apparent lack 
of Irish art blogs?
I imagine the proportion of art writing to sport, politics and music 
correlates to mainstream print media (ie. not strongly)?
 
Though traditional print media is increasingly dying out due to freely 
available content online, critical art writing has been comparatively 
slow to move in this direction. Do you agree? What are the reasons 
for this?
The decline of traditional print media due to the ‘democracy’ of 
blogging is pretty bad news for most serious journalists, both in terms 
of earning a living and developing in-depth researched pieces. The 
quality of writing on blogs is a very mixed bag indeed, and the act of 
reading from a screen, scrolling through text, is a completely different 
engagement with a text than the sensory experience of reading a paper. 
It imposes a different form and structure.
Art writers usually work freelance, and it’s not terribly well paid, 
so I’m not sure I’d see how serious art writers would have the time or 
energy to maintain a blog – the majority of bloggers are hobbyists.  
Also, it doesn’t have the prestige of being published in print.
Art is everywhere on the internet (everywhere!) Yet the significance 
of blogs in the industry pales in comparison to music/sport/politics/etc. 
Why is this? 

I guess this relates partly to the above question, in that art still 
relies pretty heavily on traditional cultural gatekeepers and 
arbiters of value. There are cultural institutions that use Facebook 
for publicity purposes, but that’s mainly a communication/ marketing tool, 
I doubt it’s effected the programming! There isn’t a visual art equivalent 
of MySpace where artists yearn to be 'discovered': there isn’t the same 
“fanbase” – a more appropriate word to use here than “audience”. 
On most of the blogs that do exist, there is a noticeable lack of debate 
and/or discussion amongst the readers. Why has this not taken off, 
when you consider so many of the heated debates that occur in 
colleges, galleries and other social situations?

Commenting on blogs, or websites in general, does not typically bring 
out the best of discursive skills (see: misogynistic, racist, homophobic 
bile on YouTube for example). So that might be one reason people in 
general are circumspect about participating. Also such comments may 
have a wider or potentially more embarrassing public than a discussion 
in a gallery or a college – you do have to put your name to such 
comments, even if it’s only an alias. And everyone knows everyone 
else in Ireland…


Crochetdermy by artist Shauna Richardson.
Image held here

Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.


'Avant-Gardening is an arts and environment project aimed at engaging 
all sectors of the community with environmental and sustainability issues 
through art, gardening and food. Avant-Gardening aims to solicit the 
community's creative responses to issues such as global warming, 
recycling and bio-diversity through an ongoing and organically evolving 
programme of arts which will give a voice to the participants and 
involve them in cutting-edge arts projects and activities. 

Avant-Gardening brings fun and creativity into the city's urban green 
spaces and encourages participants to reconsider the local environment 
and their interaction with it. 

These aims will be achieved through a programme that introduces 
participants to contemporary arts practice and environment and 
sustainability issues. We will work with artists with an interest in 
the urban environment and socially-engaged practice; including 
publicworks, Lisa Cheung and Rob Rainbow (formerly of The Light Surgeons)
 to develop ambitious projects that are as artistically valid as they 
are socially-engaged. Avant-Gardening is developed and programmed 
by Paul Green and Polly Brannan.'

Avant Gardening is based in East London, UK.
Above: Mobile Allotment, by Lisa Cheung. Image held here.
Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.

Chain link scarf pattern here
Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.

This edition of Amateur Hour features a special on hobbies/ crafts that
found new necessity in postwar Britain:
Animal husbandry: Penguin handbook (originally published 1941, recently
re-editioned) Keeping Poultry and Rabbits on Scraps &
Gardening & Knitting (both currently enjoying a lifestyle-y renaissance):
two wartime posters by Abram Games, Please Knit Now and Grow Your Own
Food. Read the rest of this entry »
This week's featured website is Cake Wrecks: When Professional Cakes 
go Horribly, Hilariously Wrong.

100_0142


Cake Wrecks on Facebook
Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.
amateurs

For the Amateur Hour archive, the exhibition Amateurs at CCA Wattis,
Centre for Contemporary Art, California:
‘Against the background of an increasingly professionalized art world, Amateurs will be the first major exhibition to survey recent artworks in which amateurism is embraced as a critical aesthetic strategy and a mode of production. Favored by conceptual artists and earlier by modernist vanguards, an aesthetic of amateurism has long served as a means for deflating models of academic and market-driven art.
Amateurs will develop an exhibition that challenges the mainstream of contemporary art by bringing together artists who elaborate on this tradition, embracing amateurism as a means for questioning basic assumptions about authorship, expertise, the relationship between artist and audience, and the contingency of cultural values. Ultimately, the exhibition will provoke much-needed reflection on the history of this tendency, and its continuing value in challenging the limitations of professionalized art practices.’
Amateurs was curated by Ralph Rugoff, former director of the Wattis Institute and current director of the Hayward Gallery at the South Bank Centre in London. It was be accompanied by a full-color exhibition catalog with essays by Rugoff and the scholar John Roberts.
Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.
This week's featured website is Home Distiller!
Generous, informative, and slightly illicit - the best of Amateur Hour.

Java55_WhiskeyStill_18-May-08.preview

Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions.
Submissions in any form welcome to
selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.
Belated thanks to Niall de Buitléar for contributing this week's
feature: Knitted Village, where mimicking the world in miniature
contributes financially to its upkeep.

_45699958_mersham5
'A knitted replica of a Kent village with 100 features including
teenagers smoking in a bus shelter has been put up for sale.
The model of Mersham, near Ashford, has been knitted by members
of the village's 40-strong Afternoon Club over the past 23 years.

The group has raised about £10,000 for their village hall by
exhibiting it. But the creation is now to be split up and sold off
because it has become too large to be transported.
Since 1986, thousands of hours of handiwork have gone into the village.

The preparation involved taking pictures and mocking up cardboard
templates of the properties and objects. Afternoon Club member
Joyce McDonagh, 82, a retired market researcher, said:
"It will be a shame to see it all broken up but it has become
something of an elephant. Most of the members are now of pensionable
age and we haven't got the men to lift the stuff. It wouldn't be so
bad if there were just two or three items but there are at least 100
now. It's massive and that's the problem."

via BBC News (video available)
Image held here

Amateur Hour is a showcase for exciting new learning, skills,
entertainment and public actions. Submissions in any form welcome
to selfinterestandsympathy@ gmail.com.

April 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930