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Above: Chanel shop, London, 2009.
Below: Stepanova's Constructivist dress, 1924.



See here
(Thanks to Andrew)


The fact is that the world is divided between users of the Macintosh 
computer and users of MS-DOS compatible computers. I am firmly of the 
opinion that the Macintosh is Catholic and that DOS is Protestant. 
Indeed, the Macintosh is counter-reformist and has been influenced by 
the ratio studiorum of the Jesuits. It is cheerful, friendly, 
conciliatory; it tells the faithful how they must proceed step by step 
to reach -- if not the kingdom of Heaven -- the moment in which their 
document is printed. It is catechistic: The essence of revelation is 
dealt with via simple formulae and sumptuous icons. 

Everyone has a right to salvation.
Umberto Eco
Mac History
Image held here 

Utopia Matters: From Brotherhoods to Bauhaus

January 23–April 11, 2010 at Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin
Following World War I, avant-gardes turned to the utopian notion of harmony they saw in abstraction and optimistically endeavored to ameliorate society through art and design. Utopia Matters: From Brotherhoods to Bauhaus will examine a sequence of international case studies from the early nineteenth century through 1933, when the Bauhaus closed in Berlin and the ascendancy of Fascism and Stalinism curbed or negatively reframed artistic endeavors, and investigate the evolution of utopian ideas in modern Western artistic thought and practice. It will address the movements of Primitivism, the Nazarenes, the Pre-Raphaelites, William Morris and Arts and Crafts, the Cornish Colony, Neo-Impressionism, De Stijl, the Bauhaus, and Russian Constructivism. This exhibition is organized by Vivien Greene, Curator of 19th- and Early 20th-Century Art at the Guggenheim Museum. This exhibition will travel to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice on May 1, 2010. A fully illustrated catalogue with essays by Greene, noted historian Russell Jacoby, and design historian Victor Margolin will also accompany the exhibition.

Utopia and the Everyday

27th November 2009 – 14th Fenruary 2010 at Centre of Contemporary Art, Geneva
This exhibition invites various local players (associations, schools, etc.) to collaborate with artists and collectives who work within the contact areas between art and educational methods. These knowledge exchanges allow contemporary art and its institutions to become a privileged space for emancipation, transformation and educational experiments. Collaborations between artists and partner publics will be carried out in different projects, outside the Centre’s premises, and presented subsequently at the Centre. They will highlight the social, political, and environmental dimensions of these practices.
Curators : Katya García-Antón and microsillons
Image: László Moholy-Nagy, AXL II, 1927 held here

* Bertolt Brecht, early banner for a theatre play: Glotzt nicht so romantisch!
Image: Eileen Gray’s E1027, France (Sarah Browne, 2009)

There are certain sectors of the art world that crave a useful social role for art. Others see art as an activity making important contributions to intellectual discourse. Many look to art for pleasure. And then there are those who appreciate all of this seriousness, but crave the trappings of the entertainment industry too – fame, power, money, glamour, hierarchies, cultural parochialism. One year the art world is interested in this, the next year it’s interested in that. It wants to party, it wants to be scholarly. Markets go up, markets go down. At the same time as the Serpentine Gallery is showing Gustav Metzger, people are posing for photographs licking a giant chocolate facsimile of a Jeff Koons sculpture and throwing themselves on giant mounds of peanuts at the gala opening of PERFORMA 09. America elects a mildly progressive president and suddenly people scream ‘socialism’ as if the year is 1954 and Senator McCarthy is on the warpath. Everything changes and nothing changes.

Dan Fox in Frieze, January-February 2010. Full article here.

Amazon says:

Customers who bought this item also bought Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’.

societe realiste, hexatopia, 2009Société Réaliste: Hexatopia, betűkészlet, 2009

TYPOPASS-CRITICAL DESIGN AND CONCEPTUAL TYPOGRAPHY at Platán Gallery, Budapest. Organized by Dorottya Gallery and tranzit. hu with the collaboration of the Polish Institute.

How does critical design emerge, the attempt to counter consumer culture with a social consciousness with the intention not only to serve customers but also to shape visual culture, even the whole of culture and society? The project focuses on typography, a visual language that can be interpreted both in the field of art and design. The exhibition presents the historical and contemporary projects and publications from the boundary of design and the visual arts in three groups: Typographic Utopias, Anti- and Parallel Design, Subversive Design.

Read the rest of this entry »

broken dome

pyrite

Images: ruined shopping mall outside the university; pyrite
[fool's gold] at the university geology museum.
Photographs by/ copyright Sarah Browne, with the kind
co-operation of the Utopian Studies Society.

10th International conference of the Utopian Studies Society,
Europe, at the University of Porto, Portugal, July 2009.

Via the Irish Times, September 23rd 2009:

The arts cement our reputation abroad, are crucial to our smart economy, provide employment at home, fuel cultural tourism, and help form the nation’s psyche – they are vital to our national recovery, writes GERRY GODLEY.
IRISH ARTISTS, your country needs you. If there was a consensus among the high achievers of the Irish diaspora gathered in Farmleigh last weekend, surely this was it. A roll call of totemic figures, including financier Dermot Desmond, philanthropist Loretta Brennan Glucksman, film-maker Neil Jordan and a forthright Minister for Arts, Martin Cullen, all avowed the importance of culture in the economic heavy lifting to come. Earlier this year, its potency in international affairs was underscored by Brian Cowen in New York, when he spoke of how “most Americans encounter Ireland today through culture: whether that is Irish dance and music, Irish film, Irish writing or an Irish play on Broadway”. Mary Robinson asserted its importance in a social fabric context speaking in August at the annual Béal na mBláth commemoration, when she said: “We should listen to our creative artists.”
Like the rest of us, they are each in their own way drawing from the well of our remarkable achievements. Each successive nominee or winner of an Oscar, Tony, Grammy, Golden Globe, Mercury and Man Booker, not to mention this week’s Emmy success, our Nobel Laureate and the world’s most successful rock band, is a jewel hewn from the rich seams of artistic expression that permeate every stratum of Irish life, representing levels of participation surpassed only by our great sporting traditions.
The arts have a vital role to play in our national recovery in five distinct areas.

According to the article, these are the arts and our reputational capital; the arts and the smart economy; the arts and cultural tourism; the arts and employment; the arts and the national psyche. The full text of Godfrey’s excellent article is held here.

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